Posted 1 hour ago
Meet the Scottish privateer  Oisean MacQueen, having Sam Heughan as playby, and played by Lily!
And maybe read his thread titled  In the dark I have no name…

Meet the Scottish privateer  Oisean MacQueen, having Sam Heughan as playby, and played by Lily!

And maybe read his thread titled In the dark I have no name

Posted 17 hours ago

Writing Tips #96: How To Write A War or Battle Scene in Your Novel

bookgeekconfessions:

Tips by Stephanie J. Hale

Originally posted on stephaniejhale.wordpress.com

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Writing about war in a novel can seem pretty daunting – especially if you haven’t experienced it yourself. War may be the main theme of your book; or war may be a just small part of your story. Even if you haven’t had direct experience on the battlefield, you can still write about war in a convincing way that moves your reader.
Here are some helpful tips that I have devised for helping first-time authors I am mentoring, which I hope will help you too.

War scenes, in some ways, are no different to other scenes in your book. The most helpful advice is to focus on small detail. Imagine you are a film director making a movie. You need wide-range camera shots to give a sense of the overall action on the battlefield. But more important than this, you also need to zoom in on individual detail to allow your audience to identify with specific characters and connect with them emotionally.

If you have a battlefield with 20,000 soldiers fighting, that’s a bit impersonal and vague. You can also end up reading about it in a very cold and detached way, a little like the experience of reading a history book. Although we can read about 20,000 men dying on a battlefield, and although these are the terrible deaths of real people, we often feel little raw emotion while we are reading.

Now, if we look at the classic novels and how they deal with war, they use a number of devices to stir our emotions, so that the book haunts us for a long time to come or we might even be moved to tears – even though the characters are invented!

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Posted 1 day ago
First listen to this gift from me to all of you - more than an hour of sea shanties! And if it inspires you to writing about seafaring adventures, join “Before the Mast” and let’s write it together!~



We have action, we have NPCs you are free to control, we love people with initiative. And we are not the usual sandboxy RPG, neither a narrative-driven one, but a story-focused writing community where each actively writing characters can make a difference and an impact on the overall plot. We are writing collaboratively a coherent story with many sideplots aside of it.

We have 4 ships of various allegiances to crew and islands belonging to the French and British crown to populate. Men aboard any ship are strongly recommended as first characters, and civilians as secondary ones. No more female sailors are allowed.

* * * * *



It’s 1720 in the West Indies. Peace is to be signed soon, and the former enemies will get allied against the common foe - pirates, looting indiscriminately. Privateers remain in the business only for hunting pirates. Will our pirate crew survive?

Which side are you on? Sharpen your blades, load your guns, drain that last sip of rhum and join our adventures, spreading death BEFORE THE MAST!

Posted 1 day ago
Meet the Scottish privateer with a troubled past, Declan Macrae, played by Moue and having as playby Tom Mison!
And maybe read his thread titled  In the dark I have no name…

Meet the Scottish privateer with a troubled past, Declan Macrae, played by Moue and having as playby Tom Mison!

And maybe read his thread titled In the dark I have no name

Posted 1 day ago

Writing Tips #121: Writing Realistic Injuries

bookgeekconfessions:

Tips by Leia Fee, with additions by Susannah Shepherd
Originally posted on users.totalise.co.uk

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Introduction    

Characters climbing cliffs with broken arms or getting knocked out for an hour or so and then running around like nothing happened, bug me.  It doesn’t take much longer to get it right, and I’ve found that getting doing the research to get it right can often lead to whole new story possibilities I hadn’t thought of before.

I’m not any sort of medical expert - research for this article has come from a variety of sources from medical texts to personal experience – (I’m just a teeny bit accident prone…)  I do historical reenactment and a large part of information here comes from the ‘traumatic injury’ (or ‘the nasty things that can happen to you in combat’ information we give the public and new members to make them go ‘urggh , I’m glad this isn’t for real’.

General Remarks

There’s a lot of ‘relatively’ and ‘probably’ in this article because everyone reacts differently to injury.

Oh and before I start - one pet peeve… ‘laceration’ does not mean ‘a very bad cut’ – it is a term for a specific type of wound caused by the tearing rather than the slicing of the skin.  It’s the sort of cut you get from being hit with a blunt object (or a fist).

What’s Normal…?

For a normal, reasonably healthy adult the following reading are ‘normal’.  Some variation is usual and what’s normal for one person may be abnormal for another.

Pulse rate between 60-100 beats per minute.  A fitter person will have a rate towards the slower end of the margin and a child or young person will have a naturally high rate.  Any drastic increase or decrease in pulse rate is cause for concern.

Blood pressure 120-140 over 70-90.  This can vary with the time of day, amount of stress and a number of other factors.  High blood pressure is not usually immediately dangerous but can cause long term damage.  Low blood pressure can cause faintness, dizziness and blackouts and is usually a sign that there is an underlying problem to be treated.

Body Temperature 36°C (98.6°F) to 37.5°C (99.5F).  Relatively minor variations in temperature are cause for concern.  

Reactions to Injury

Everyone is unique and will react differently.  Some people yell and scream when they are hurt, others will keep quiet.  Some will insist that they’re perfectly fine and be annoyed by attempts to help.  Some people are very squeamish and find the idea of how badly they’re hurt more traumatic than the actual injury.  Find out how the character you’re writing an injury for reacts and stick to it unless you have very good reason not to. 

Fainting

Can be caused by pain, fear, surprise, or other emotional stress and is usually not a major problem as long as they wake up within a few seconds.  Immediately after fainting a person’s pulse would be very slow but recover quickly.

Shock

Can follow many injuries and can be as dangerous or more so than the actual injury.  It is not just a case of someone suffering from a nasty fright because they got hurt.

Symptoms include:

Pulse and respiration abnormally fast or slow,
Pale, clammy skin,
Shakiness,
Dilated pupils,
Confusion.

Someone suffering from shock should be lain down and kept warm.

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Posted 1 day ago
rpg-central:

||PLOT|| CREW LIST|| FACE CLAIM|| NEWBIE GUIDE || WANTED ADS||
We have action, we have NPCs you are free to control, we love people with initiative. And we are not the usual sandboxy RPG, neither a narrative-driven one, but a story-focused writing community where each actively writing characters can make a difference and an impact on the overall plot. We are writing collaboratively a coherent story with many sideplots aside of it. We have 4 ships of various allegiances to crew and islands belonging to the French and British crown to populate. Men aboard any ship are strongly recommended as first characters, and civilians as secondary ones. No more female sailors are allowed.
* * * * *
It’s 1720 in the West Indies. Peace is to be signed soon, and the former enemies will get allied against the common foe - pirates, looting indiscriminately. Privateers remain in the business only for hunting pirates. Will our pirate crew survive? Which side are you on? Sharpen your blades, load your guns, drain that last sip of rhum and join our adventures, spreading death BEFORE THE MAST!

rpg-central:



We have action, we have NPCs you are free to control, we love people with initiative. And we are not the usual sandboxy RPG, neither a narrative-driven one, but a story-focused writing community where each actively writing characters can make a difference and an impact on the overall plot. We are writing collaboratively a coherent story with many sideplots aside of it.

We have 4 ships of various allegiances to crew and islands belonging to the French and British crown to populate. Men aboard any ship are strongly recommended as first characters, and civilians as secondary ones. No more female sailors are allowed.

* * * * *



It’s 1720 in the West Indies. Peace is to be signed soon, and the former enemies will get allied against the common foe - pirates, looting indiscriminately. Privateers remain in the business only for hunting pirates. Will our pirate crew survive?

Which side are you on? Sharpen your blades, load your guns, drain that last sip of rhum and join our adventures, spreading death BEFORE THE MAST!

Posted 1 day ago
Posted 1 day ago
Meet countess Katharina Schwarzenberger, played by Secar and having as playby Kirsten Dunst. She is the belle of the ball, making to suffer high officers from both British and French Navy…


strawbe-rry: Marie Antoinette (2006) dir. Sophia Coppola

Meet countess Katharina Schwarzenberger, played by Secar and having as playby Kirsten Dunst. She is the belle of the ball, making to suffer high officers from both British and French Navy…

strawbe-rry: Marie Antoinette (2006) dir. Sophia Coppola

Posted 2 days ago

Writing Tips #98: Foreshadowing and Suspense

bookgeekconfessions:

Tips by Anne Marble

Originally posted on writing-world.com

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Suspense is an important element of any story. So you’re not writing romantic suspense? That doesn’t matter. All writers should work suspense into their stories. Suspense doesn’t have to involve car chases and psychopaths stalking your heroine. There is suspense in everything from a tense boardroom meeting to a Regency ball where the heroine risks being compromised by a cad to a frontier heroine facing off alone against a dust storm. Lives don’t have to be at stake. You, as the author, can generate suspense out of relatively mundane things, as long as they are important to the story, such as whether the stuffy hero will walk under the door just before the pail of water falls down.

Foreshadowing is one tool you can use to heighten the suspense. It gets a separate section because it can get pretty complicated, and it can be hard to foreshadow events just right.

Leaving Your Readers in Suspenders

Some writers have described suspense as being like a roller coaster. The trip up to the top is the suspense, and the fast trip down the hill is the pay-off. I prefer to think of suspense as being like the Thursday of a working week. The week’s almost over, you’re looking forward to Friday night and the weekend.

Make the Climax Live Up to the Suspense

As we all know, sometimes the anticipation is more exciting than the actual event. A nice sunny Thursday can turn into a rainy weekend filled with chores. A suspenseful novel can sputter out when the solution is unfolded. How do you plant the best ending for your story? Start by thinking of the reader. What would interesting, shock, and shake the reader? Is the resolution too pat? If so, make it harder for your characters. Oh, think of your characters, too, of course. Do they have enough obstacles? Are they reacting in character to what happens. Oh, and make sure the villains get an appropriate comeuppance.

If the suspense is good enough, readers may forgive a relatively weak ending. However, they may be less likely to pick up your next book. The best writers of suspense know that they can get away with teasing the reader for only so long. Eventually, there has to be a pay-off.

Avoid Contrived Suspense

There’s nothing more annoying than stories where the suspense comes about because the heroine walks into a parking garage alone even though there’s a serial killer out to get her. Or, leaving aside the world of romantic suspense, suspense can be created artificially in other stories as well. For example, when a heroine in a historical romance decides to do something that will get her in deep doo-doo, such as making out with the hero, and even worse, refusing to marry him when they are caught in a comprising position. However, all too many books try to stretch out the suspense by making the heroine decide that she doesn’t want to marry the hero, no matter what the risk to her reputation. She wants to remain free, like the birds. Of course, eventually she’ll realize that she has to give in, and they’ll marry, until the next silly obstacle. If the heroine has a reason to do these things, that’s fine. Otherwise, readers might feel manipulated. Characters need reasons to act a certain way. Not just curiosity. If they’re in mortal danger, most people will wait to find an answer instead of cavorting in a deserted building or other creepy place.

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Posted 2 days ago

It’s always about, somehow, finding a part of myself that is relevant, and then turning the volume up on that particular part. So, I am all of the characters I’ve ever played, and I am none of them at the same time.” — Tom Hiddleston

Meet the British Navy Master gunner Rowan Bloodworth, played by Alecto and having Tom Hiddleston as a playby.

And read his journal, titled Seasons to Cycles!